social marketing


Influencer Marketing

Influencer marketing has been growing significantly for many years now, but thanks to Jessica Bevilacqua & Elizabeth Del Giudice at St Joseph’s Communications, we can now see the sector figures in an infographic. After gathering data from numerous sources, the infographic was created and shows the influencer market could be worth $10bn by 2020, up from $2bn in 2017. Although the figures are in dollars, the point being highlighted about the growth of the market is certainly one that will reflect globally. In the release of the infographic, Jessica Bevilacqua & Elizabeth Del Giudice point......

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Online marketing techniques

Marketing techniques are continuously evolving and adapting to help finding new customers and drive a greater number of sales, especially online. The internet has changed significantly, even in the past 5 years and now it’s becoming a greater tool than ever to increase business. Using the newest online marketing techniques, it’s possible to find a treasure trove of new customers, untapped by competitors. Newest Online Marketing Techniques Social Influencers: Almost every industry has an expert with a large online following (Martin Lewis – finance, food – Clerkenwell Boy). These social influeners can help......

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I remember back to the days when social marketing was described as ‘spending money for a good cause without actually expecting direct sales in return’. For instance, a care home in the Midlands offered to pay £10,000 to refurbish a nursery because vandals had destroyed the building. The nursery didn’t have insurance and was struggling to find the financial support. The nursery managed to re-open and the care home received publicity and was thought of within the community as a ‘nice’ company. Social marketing has been in existence for decades and despite......

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This week we saw Sony criticise the 10:10 climate change advert produced by Richard Curtis claiming it was “ill-conceived and tasteless”. The video shows children being blown up, along with celebrities David Ginola and Gillian Anderson, for not caring about climate change. The campaign follows with the slogan “Cut your carbon by 10%. No pressure.” What’s the problem for Sony? Ok, apart from the obvious – it’s a horrific advert that’s designed to shock – there is a brand issue for Sony. Big brands don’t want to endorse and support controversial change......

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